How To Create A Resume Website: Simple, Informative Guide

You’ve probably heard that every posted job attracts 250 applicants. Unfortunately, unemployment related to the COVID-19 pandemic has sent that number soaring. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell puts the real US unemployment rate at close to ten percent. So, count on your resume competing with hundreds, even thousands of others. I’m not trying to be disheartening. It’s just to land your dream job, you need to stand out. Posting your resume online can help. If you’re wondering how to create a resume websitehere are some tips.

Revise, revise, revise

Before you set about creating a website, make sure you already have compelling content. How long has it been since you polished your resume? Spend some time making it perfect. You may even want to start fresh. There are plenty of services that offer free templates (although you may need to pay money to download a PDF). Browse some images online. Remember to bullet-point accomplishments, not tasks. [EDITOR OR LINK TO 2021’S FIVE BEST RESUME…]

In other words, describe how you increased sales by 10% rather than just managing a team.

Do It Yourself?

It’s never a good idea to spend money you don’t have –– especially if you’re currently between opportunities. Wix or Squarespace Offer low-cost website construction that you can easily do on your own. Not only do they both offer free templates with drag and drop features, they also provide setup support. The downside is that it can seem like everyone is using the same template. If your goal is to stand out (and it should be) take the time to make your page unique. Even if you don’t know how to create a resume website and plan to hire someone, you should still take a look at what’s out there. You may be inspired. Plus you’ll have a better idea about the best way to differentiate yourself. However, if you can afford a little extra, hiring a web developer to design your site will improve it’s chances of being noticed. Check out freelance sites like Upwork. The small details a pro can add will make your page shine.

Options, There are Options

Some of us hate confining our resume to a single page. Getting your own site eliminates the need to do that. In fact, if you just upload a PDF file you should type in some text as well. This is because search engines can’t “read” PDFs –– which means your resume won’t come up when a hiring manager plugs your name into Google. So if you keep it to one page, write a short bio for the landing page and place a button linking it to a PDF of your resume. If you expand to multiple pages, you can have separate ones for each employer. This is the place where your prose should sparkle. Detail your achievements with an eye toward the job you hope to get.

You can also use media –– just avoid stock images! Instead, use action shots of you at a former job or pictures depicting the businesses where you worked. Your landing page picture needs to be prominent and professional although it doesn’t have to be in the top left hand corner. Whether you do it yourself or hire someone, the site should be designed with mobile in mind since most people look at websites on their phone. Make sure you have a contact page–– after all, the reason you created the site in the first place was so you’d get noticed by employers.

Add Content

If you enjoy writing, a short blog related to your field can help. Keep Search Engine Optimization in mind. Before you begin, imagine the questions a hiring manager might ask. Incorporate them into the text–– that’s how you improve search results. After all, if no one sees a website, does it really exist?

When your resume is ready for its close up, link it to your social media and LinkedIn. Curating an ecosystem containing all of your platforms while displaying an eye-catching, polished resume online greatly improves your odds of getting the job you want “in real life.”

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